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Database Internals: A Deep-Dive Into How Distributed Data Systems Work Paperback – 18 October 2019

4.7 out of 5 stars 132 ratings

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Product details

  • Language : English
  • Paperback : 280 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 1492040347
  • ISBN-13 : 978-1492040347
  • Customer reviews:
    4.7 out of 5 stars 132 ratings

Product description

About the Author

Alex Petrov (http: //coffeenco.de/, @ifesdjeen) is Apache Cassandra Committer, storage systems enthusiast working as a Core Database Engineer at DataStax. Before that, he's been working on building distributed systems and data processing pipelines for various companies.

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Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews
Nilendu Misra
4.0 out of 5 stars Summarized Recent Overview of Storage & Distributed Systems
1 December 2019 - Published on Amazon.com
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4.0 out of 5 stars Summarized Recent Overview of Storage & Distributed Systems
Reviewed in the United States on 1 December 2019
Mastery in systems abstraction comes through a philosophical pivot. While an enthusiastic beginner considers successful "use cases", an experienced traveler - through her implicit awareness of futility against entropy - often only considers failure and just tries her best. As more systems, and more of every system, are being dictated by the twin forces of economics and architectural modernism, a much higher percentage of design and development efforts in software should be dedicated to understanding fundamentals (CPU registers, branch prediction etc.) and essential complexities (multi-node consensus, replication failures etc.). This book is a good start.

Database Internals is divided into two parts - the first deals with database storage. Especially good sections put a 9-cell flash-light on how many recent architectures are indeed built to tackle complexity bottom-up. i.e., LSM (log-structured merge) trees nicely complement the "write amplification" of Solid-State Disks. The discussion on the canonical B-tree and its multiple siblings (especially Bw-tree) is very well done. The functional difference between locks and latches would be enlightening even for experienced database practitioners - locks are used to manage transactions, latches to guard the *physical* storage representation.

The second half of the book focusing on distributed systems is more uneven in quality. It is, however, a great start of economized discussion of about 50 "Best Papers" on Leader Election, Failure/Crash detection, Replication and how distributed systems friendly "consensus protocols", rather than atomic ones like 2-phase commit work better. In many ways, distributed systems have veered from monarchy (single, immutable leader deciding everything, including the next leader) to a true republic (leader is still almost omnipotent, but is regularly replaced by the constituents). The comparative analysis of Paxos, ZAB and Raft - with clear sequence diagrams - is very well done.

The quality of writing is good, though could have been helped with more ruthless editing. The area covered is simply too broad, other than the intersect of SSDs and Modern DB architecture which is very deep and very good. Still the book easily deserves at least 4-stars for the enthusiasm and for its good attempt to convey distributed systems pedagogy to general practitioners. Pair it with Martin Kleppmann's "Designing Data Intensive Applications" and Ken Birman's "Guide to Reliable Distributed Systems".
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42 people found this helpful
ZM
3.0 out of 5 stars Not deep enough
18 May 2020 - Published on Amazon.com
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8 people found this helpful
Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars Good content shame about the printing odor
1 November 2019 - Published on Amazon.com
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11 people found this helpful
Ashish Paliwal
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Books out there
4 November 2019 - Published on Amazon.com
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Books out there
Reviewed in the United States on 4 November 2019
This is one of the best texts covering Database internals. Databases are used everyday, and understanding what happens under the hood is daunting task. This book takes a pragmatic approach on the topic, starting with basics and then taking a deeper dive into how the basic data structures and concept come together. IMHO, this book shall appeal to both Database developer's and engineer's who want to understand how databases work. This book is must have to for the engineer's who really want to get into Database development. Otherwise also this book is a must have reference in general. I personally liked the attention to details in the book on what really matter's when writing a real database. The concepts are equally applicable to SQL and NoSQL databases.
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6 people found this helpful
J.R. Garcia
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Resource for Understanding Database Internals
4 November 2019 - Published on Amazon.com
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3 people found this helpful